Sky Full of Bacon


Sky Full of Bacon 11: A Better Fish

“The always enlightening podcast Sky Full of Bacon… So much of the seafood discussion is difficult for consumers to navigate but this 22-minute video offers a clear perspective on what happy seafood is out there.” —Serious Eats

Eat more fish, eat less fish… dive into the confusing world of fish today and see for yourself how fish gets to your table and how chefs are exploring new and more sustainable choices.

Sky Full of Bacon 11: A Better Fish from Michael Gebert on Vimeo.

You hear a lot about fish these days— about eating it for your health, about overfishing and the health of the oceans, about farmed vs. wild. In this Sky Full of Bacon video podcast, I dive deep into the world of fish as it meets us at the dinner table. I go on a tour of one of the country’s largest fish distributors, to see how they move through thousands of pounds of fresh fish a week, and talk with sales rep Carl Galvan, who’s passionate about getting his chef clients to look past the standard menu fishes and explore new and more sustainable options. And I talk to chefs, fish sellers and experts from Chicago’s Shedd Aquarium about sustainability, and some exciting projects that offer promise for a future that still has fish in it. It runs 22 minutes, and it’s the first of a two-part exploration of fish issues that will conclude next month with my trip on a Lake Michigan whitefish boat.

Here’s Supreme Lobster’s website (Carl’s market report is linked on the main page), and you too can follow Carl’s Twitter feed here.

Here’s the website for Cleanfish, the sustainable fish broker I talk to. In the video Cleanfish’s Alisha Lumea mainly talks about their farmed fish projects, but one of their wild projects is just now coming into season— Nunavut Arctic Char from an Inuit community in far northern Canada. Read about it and watch Cleanfish’s own video here, and follow them on Twitter here for lots of sustainable fish news.

Here’s the Shedd’s Right Bite program.

Of course, there’s a lot of stuff about overfishing out there. Here’s a documentary about it that’s in theaters right now, and here’s a good piece from The Atlantic’s current issue that suggests a market solution to it.

Here’s my post about the meal at Taxim that included eating black cod liver; Philip Foss of Lockwood also posted about cooking with it here.

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About Sky Full of Bacon
Sky Full of Bacon #10: Prosciutto di Iowa
Sky Full of Bacon #9: Raccoon Stories
Sky Full of Bacon #8: Pear-Shaped World
Sky Full of Bacon #7: Eat This City
Sky Full of Bacon #6: There Will Be Pork (pt. 2)
Sky Full of Bacon #5: There Will Be Pork (pt. 1)
Sky Full of Bacon #4: A Head’s Tale
Sky Full of Bacon #3: The Last Brisket Show
Sky Full of Bacon #2: Duck School
Sky Full of Bacon #1: How Local Can You Go?

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4 Responses to “Sky Full of Bacon 11: A Better Fish”

  1. Sky Full of Bacon » Blog Archive » A Perfect Day For Pierogifish Says:

    […] head was still swimming with fish from the new Sky Full of Bacon podcast (that was a direct link to it, by the way, that will skip you past the ten zillion pierogi pics to […]

  2. Sky Full of Bacon » Blog Archive » A nosegay in thanks Says:

    […] thanks re the most recent podcast, including the lovely Helen of Grub Street (formerly Menu Pages), who also linked my Pierogi Fest […]

  3. Jon in Albany Says:

    Finally got a chance to watch the latest podcast. Another nice job. The maritime fois looked like it would be very interesting in capable hands. I’m looking forward to watching you take to the seas.

  4. Sky Full of Bacon » Blog Archive » Chaise Lounge: Tomorrow’s Hot Chef In Today’s Hot Nightclub Says:

    […] first became aware of Chaise Lounge when Carl Galvan suggested including it in my sustainable fish podcast, as he had recently helped chef Cary Taylor move to almost all sustainable fish.  If I’d […]